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April 23, 2014

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James Burbank James Burbank

Mark Rudd: The Albatross around Alan Webber’s Neck (You Should Be Scared!)

Stop the presses. In a copyrighted story this morning, the Albuquerque Journal’s James Monteleone links those two forever political siamese twins, Santa Fe candidate for Gov., Alan Webber and far, far leftist Weather Undergroundie Mark Rudd. I for one am shaking in my boots, or my sandals, as the case may be. 

Rumor has it that in 1532 Rudd rode with Pancho Villa. Rumor has it that Rudd was spotted somewhere near a place where Fidel Castro coughed after lighting up a stogie. Rumor has it that some forty years ago Rudd didn’t like the little military scuffle in Vietnam one bit. Rumor has it that he became a terrorist who wanted to blow up government washrooms and buildings, which is probably why he ultimately became a math teacher at CNM.  Teachers are pretty much all terrorists, you know...

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April 23, 2014

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Wally Gordon Wally Gordon

Mountain love affair

Who is there in New Mexico who does not love mountains? Our love affair with our mountains may be because aside from the mountains the land is more drab brown than vivid green, more desiccated than lush. There is not a lot to be said for our flatlands, the Chihuahua Desert landscape of rocks and brush, where what we call rivers are really streams and what we call streams are more often seasonal arroyos.

This mountain love affair has spawned a lot of books, of which the newest, and one of the most lavish, is the just-published, New Mexico’s High Peaks: A Photographic Celebration, by Michael Butterfield (UNM Press, $39.95, 188 pages including 134 color photographs)...

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April 22, 2014

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Margaret Randall - International Raconteur Margaret Randall - International Raconteur

Climate Foreclosure / Climate Migration

Climate migrants may soon be a new breed: the latest wave of those forced to leave their homes and seek refuge elsewhere. These will not be people fleeing political violence or poverty. Or not simply those two things. They won’t be leaving only their homes and the graves of their ancestors behind. These will be the hundreds of thousands—perhaps millions—forced to migrate because their homes, ancestors’ graves and every bit of familiar landscape will have disappeared, beneath the rising sea levels caused by global warming...

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April 22, 2014

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Demis Foster Demis Foster

District court ruling removes Rep. Jeff from the June 3 primary election ballot

Conservation Voters New Mexico (CVNM) and plaintiff Larry King announce that the New Mexico Eleventh Judicial District Judge Louis DePauli ruled yesterday that State Representative Sandra Jeff did not gather enough valid petition signatures to appear on the June 3 primary election ballot.

Plaintiff Larry King said that “the judge did the right thing today. His decision confirms that everyone has to follow the rules.”

We commend Judge DePauli for examining each signature individually over two full days. He left no stone unturned in the search for the truth...

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April 21, 2014

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James Burbank James Burbank

Hey, remember…

Hey, remember the New Mexico Commission on the Status of Women? Of course not.  Temporary Governor Martinez killed this stupid commission that served women thoughout the state with a line item veto that severed the funding.  That was one of her first and signal acts as Temporary Gov. Yippee KiowKaiyay!

Recently an article in the shamelessly liberal, slanted, and desperate Mother Jones quoted our soft and caring ersatz governor saying right before her blessed election, “What the hell is that?  What the hell does a commission on women’s cabinet do all day long?”...

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April 19, 2014

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Morgan Smith Morgan Smith

Semana Santa or Holy Week in Spain

Suddenly the lights go out in the whole town. We’re in pitch black darkness. The crowd is silent. Then with a great creaking sound, the enormous wooden doors of the cathedral slowly open.

We’re in Caravaca de la Cruz, a small town in the little known region of Murcia in southern Spain. It’s midnight and this is our first Semana Santa or Holy Week experience. Frankly, we have no idea what to expect...

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April 18, 2014

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Elizabeth Jacobson Elizabeth Jacobson

Weekly Poem: The Girl in Her Head

This time she is in front of the mirror
plucking at the few white eyelashes growing
among the other dark ones, above one eye
only.  She wears a long grey robe, her hair
pulled off her face, she wonders if she never
moved from in front of this mirror would there
be a point when she stopped seeing this self
or another self...

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April 17, 2014

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Submitted Anonymously Submitted Anonymously

International Superstars

When I moved to Albuquerque many years ago, friends and family were confused. They had no idea where this strange sounding place was--east of Alamut? west of Shambala?--and couldn't believe it actually existed outside the imagination of some crazed, inbred descendant of Zane Grey. But then the Albuquerque Police Department helped my friends and family by landing their brand new helicopter in the Krispy Kreme (TM) parking lot. Remember this was before twitter and memes, but the news rapidly spread around the world. The APD truly protected--their supply of donuts--and served--to give Albuquerque international fame...

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April 17, 2014

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John J. Hunt John J. Hunt

Word War

Let’s face it, I’m at war with words. Every battle is important. Some people crack under the strain, like soldiers at the front. Fine print, Orwellian transpositions, heroic hyperbole of all sorts; these are a few of the tactics words use against us.

I have no respect for words, they’re spineless; they lie to us all the time. Like prostitutes, they don’t care who uses them. They’re duplicitous, and they work against our happiness—but what else do we have? What can we do? We’re besieged by words, assaulted, that’s why a writer’s task is to defend us, to hold words at bay...

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April 16, 2014

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Margaret Randall - International Raconteur Margaret Randall - International Raconteur

A Review: The Day of Shelly’s Death

On October 11, 1981, the second day of what was to have been several months of joint fieldwork in a remote region of the Philippines, Renato Rosaldo’s wife and companion anthropologist, Michelle (Shelly) Rosaldo, fell from a precarious trail to her death 60 feet below. These are the facts. Suddenly, the woman he loved was gone, their two small children motherless, their immediate and long-range future dramatically reorganized.

In The Day of Shelly’s Death (Duke University Press, 2014), Renato Rosaldo calls on his most painful memories and all his skills—as poet and social anthropologist, as husband, father and someone who sifts through time and feeling in multi-faced testament—to give us the finely woven layers of a tragic event and the people who inhabited that event...

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